DALLAS CLAYTON – HUFFINGTON POST – 16 BEAUTIFUL LIFE LESSONS

Clayton-HuffPoArticleNews

The Huffington Post just ran an article by Priscilla Frank on the prolific work of Giant Artist Dallas Clayton! It’s a great read, and sets Dallas’ works apart from standard childhood stuff by highlighting the youthful reductions of adult lessons that they instill in their viewers. Frank notes that “our favorite thing about Clayton’s images is, despite their youthful audience, their ability to remain fresh and unorthodox, never dipping into any Hallmark territory sugary sweetness.” Dallas adds: “I make things for children and if you’re the kind of person who thinks of that as saccharine you’re probably a shitty person. It’s the constant battle between poetry and bumper sticker.”

Dallas has many books out and is currently working on various projects in between touring across the country to spread his cheerful wisdom to kids of all ages. Follow him on Instagram and be treated to a delightful Daily Dose of Dallas!

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GIANT ARTISTS – INTERVIEW – GLYNIS CARPENTER

In continuation of our Summer Intern’s Interview Series, we pick up today with Giant Artist Glynis Carpenter. It wasn’t an immediate dive into the profession for Glynis. She first considered being a vet, then a lawyer, and then finally decided to pursue a career in photography, something close to her roots. And although Glynis Carpenter‘s career aspirations have changed, her long locks have stayed with her all the while. In this interview Glynis helps us realize how we must all stick to our roots.

Why are you drawn to photography?

I always was an artist. I painted and drew my whole life, so photography seemed like a natural career path after I graduated college and realized I wanted to do something artistic. My grandmother was a NY model, so I always liked fashion and always was a bit in the modeling industry because of her.

 

Favorite/most memorable photo you’ve taken? Favorite photo of somebody else’s?

It’s challenging to pick out one photo, but for shoots, I had a lot of fun on my glitter bomb shoot. I had been toying around with that idea for a while before Vice signed on to do it. I love a lot of other people’s photos! I put a lot of them on my Pinterest!

 

What did you think you were going to be when you “grew up”?

I always said “veterinarian,” when asked as a child. It never wavered. I was an English major in college, and I was enrolled in LSAT prep classes when I stopped and decided to move to NY to pursue photography.

 

One piece of advice you would give to somebody getting into the biz?

Develop a style and stick with it for at least a couple of years. People have to know what they are hiring when the want to hire you. Take photos often, and work hard on making cool personal work. The commercial work should follow suit we hope!

 

Worst haircut you’ve ever had?

I’ve never had a bad haircut. I’ve had long, blunt cut hair that I wear in a ponytail or bun most of my life. It is pretty funny though because it makes me look eerily similar to my childhood and teenage photos.

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GIANT ARTISTS – NEW WEBSITE LAUNCHES

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We are very pleased to announce the launch of:

We’ve enlarged the size of all images and condensed the menu options to draw focus on the most important element: our artists’ work. We’ve also added an entirely new function: Categories. We’ve done this to make searching for particular images easier, and also to reveal the versatility of all our artists.

Take some time to check out our new virtual digs. We think you’re going to like it.

 

Thanks!

Giant Artists


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INTERN SIGN-OFF

In honor of my time in Los Angeles coming to a close, here is a vintage shot from my first visit to L.A. in 2009 with my best friend Sophie and my connection to all things cool in L.A., the wonderful Jen Jenkins.

It hasn’t rained a single day that I’ve been here and the layer of dust and grime that has accumulated on my car is proof. I usually rely on a freak torrential downpour as a carwash, but no such luck. I knew L.A. had nice weather, but the consistency of the 75 and sunny has been pretty nice for somebody accustomed to soupy Georgia summers.  Besides realizing the validity of the widely discussed weather patterns of this part of the U.S. (Cool discovery, Sarah!), I did learn a lot about this industry and about myself as an almost member of the “real-world.”

This summer I got a taste of what has undoubtedly been the experience of many fresh college grads who start lives in new cities… It’s kind of hard, man. L.A. is a good place to make this transition because, when you’re feeling lonely, you realize that the backdrop of a fantastically sunny day does not quite fit the melodrama of the pity party you’re having in your head. So, you go to the beach, sit outside at a cafe, or stand outside for five minutes before binge watching OITNB, and you end up having a good day.

Up until the moment I graduate in May 2015, my social experience will be facilitated by an environment of like individuals. This doesn’t happen when you leave college. Not everyone is 21 and confused with you. Some are around 31 and confused. Many are a little older and wiser, and everyone, regardless of age or merit, has been seriously into giving me advice. In my short time here, I’ve gotten photography advice, travel advice, job advice, and L.A. advice. Here are some of the highlights from the past couple of months:

“Take lots of photos.” 

Many of us read Outliers. We know the drill. But the importance of repeated practice was stressed even more to me this summer by some of Giant’s finest. Building a portfolio of personal projects, travel photos, whatever else you can get your camera on, is really important when it comes to becoming a successful photographer. Behind every great photo are 1,000s of kind of  lame ones. 

“Traveling is the best thing you can do to gain perspective.”

I did hear this a lot, but I really enjoyed playing it up even more to my parents during my time here. “Hey, Mom/Dad. WOW, you’ve got to hear the great advice So-And-So gave me today…” 

“Sometimes (most of the time) people don’t understand creative careers. And sometimes you just have to go for it.

I got this advice from a lot of people in different forms. Most notably, though, was Danger, the Apple Genius who helped me set up my new iPhone. My old phone took way too long to connect to the cloud, so I ended up hearing all about his post-grad anxiety and the new clothing line he has been working on and is about to launch. After all, an L.A. experience isn’t complete without a complete stranger telling you all about their artistic endeavors. 

“Reacting to unpleasant people doesn’t benefit you. As much as you may want to say something, don’t waste your energy.”

Back-talking teenybopper Sarah is rolling her eyes, slamming her door, and writing a strongly worded diary entry at this one. But I couldn’t agree more. In any job, people will test your limits intensionally or unintentionally. In my time here, I’ve seen some flawless handling of some major sass. Professionalism, son. 

“Don’t be afraid of rejection. You’re not going to please everyone. But be persistent.”

Living in Denmark for a semester, I realized how terribly sensitive Americans can be. And, this summer, I’ve learned that it’s important to not take rejection too personally in this field. (But remember to take success and praise really personally.) 

“L.A. traffic is avoidable if you try.”

I don’t believe this one yet, but it’s a nice thought. I still need to learn the tricks. 

 

I’m so thankful to everyone who has made this summer such a formative experience for me. I’ve really enjoyed meeting Giant’s artists and reps and the other professionals I’ve encountered along the way. I’ve had the chance to get to know some really honest, passionate, and talented folks. Until next time, L.A.

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GIANT ARTISTS – LEBOOK CONNECTIONS SF 2014 – AGENTS COMMUNITY TABLE

This past February, Giant’s very own Jen Jenkins participated in a Community Table at LeBook Connections SF with other leading agents in the photo industry, put together by Brite Productions and Heather Elder Represents. Subjects in the discussion ranged from: the needs and roles a successful commercial photographer must fulfill in order to balance creativity with business, what it takes to inspire an agent, defining usage rights, advances, and even the sensitivities of e-mail blasts. To learn about what it takes to make it in today’s commercial photo world, check out what the pros themselves have to say on the Brite and Elder Blog: (Part 1) and (Part 2). Thanks to everybody involved, we enjoyed being a part of it and look forward to next year!

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GIANT ARTISTS' SUMMER INTERN – INTERVIEW – DAVID CALDERLEY

Another Giant Artists’ interview from our summer intern, Sarah Wasko:

An early interest in comics has led Giant’s David Calderley to his career in illustration and design. In the second installment of my quickie interviews, we learn a little about David’s inspirations, aspirations, and unfortunate hair-spirations.

Why are you drawn to illustration and design?

I used to love illustration and design work as a kid, firstly with British comics then got hooked on line illustration and typography to complete the picture. Then moving on to make my own cassette tape artworks and fake movie posters!?… Six years in art schools made it personal.

What is your favorite/most memorable illustration of yours and/or of somebody else’s?

Alan Aldridge: Chelsea Girls. Love the collage, mixed media and the overall idea together with killer type.

What did you think you were going to be when you “grew up”?

Astronaut… who liked to draw.

One piece of advice you would give to somebody getting into the biz?

Try to be always tolerant, the true test of your mettle.

Worst haircut you’ve ever had?

A very unfortunate ‘Hitler’esque doo.

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GIANT ARTISTS' SUMMER INTERN – INTERVIEW – DALLAS CLAYTON

More from our summer intern, Sarah Wasko:

I asked the Giant Artists roster to answer a few questions to allow everyone to get to know them a little better. One of the first to reply was Dallas Clayton whose cheeky answers, although short and sweet, are full of intrigue and wisdom.

Why are you drawn to illustration and design? 

I like to draw things and write things that make people happy. 

What is your favorite/most memorable illustration of yours and/or of somebody else’s?

I try not to choose favorites in life and in art. Every drawing has the potential to be someone’s favorite.

What did you think you were going to be when you “grew up”? 

I’m still trying to figure it out. 

One piece of advice you would give to somebody getting into the biz?

Make what makes you feel good and probably don’t use the term “biz”.

Worst haircut you’ve ever had?

All of them between ages 11 and 23. 


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GIANT ARTISTS' SUMMER INTERN – SARAH WASKO

Today we invited Giant’s fabulous summer intern, Sarah Wasko, a rising senior at Elon University, to take over the blog and write, well, whatever she wanted!  Here, a rogue run-in with an ex sparks a connection to an inspiring street photographer.  As an agency, we also find inspiration in fresh perspectives and happenstance.  Thanks, Sarah, for the great read!

I haven’t done much sightseeing since moving to L.A. for the summer, but this past weekend, my little 6’7” brother came to visit me, and we packed an unnatural number of things into the three and a half days that he was here. Though science would argue otherwise, I’m pretty sure I got a sunburn on the left half of my body from all the driving. The only person more violently laid back than me is my brother Joe, so we had a pretty great time or whatever.

We spent a day in San Diego and, true to form, we stopped in Balboa Park and then headed to Seaport Village. To my knowledge, I only know one person in San Diego; a guy who I had a pseudo relationship with for about a month and a half. Short story shorter, it started weird and it ended weird. He moved to San Diego after graduation, and the chances of me seeing him were quite literally one in a million. Naturally, I saw him walking down the side of the road just feet from my car, and we made really uncomfortable, prolonged eye contact. This will probably remain the biggest coincidence of my life for years to come.

Photography that captures coincidence or visual pun has always interested me. It is an ingenious way to approach the art. Though it would require a little backstory to understand the breadth of the moment, it would have been great to have my weird San Diego run-in captured in a photograph.

Maciej Dakowicz is a Polish street photographer based in Mumbai who has captured a superhuman number of photographs of real life happenstance. What makes these photos great, in contrast to my awkward staring contest, is the understated nature of the moments. They are constantly occurring but often go unnoticed. These photos showcase Dakowicz’s eye for miraculous instances of visual coincidence in his home of India as well as Tunisia, Yemen, Bangladesh, Malawi, and an impressive host of other nations.

Sarah

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DJUNA BEL – NEW PROJECT – ALL SUMMER IN A DAY

Djuna Bel showcases her versatility as a stylist in her kid-friendly collaboration with Elizabeth Weinberg, “All Summer in a Day.” Loosely based on Ray Bradbury’s short, the photographs tell the story of children who essentially live in L.A.’s antithesis, a futuristic planet where the sun only shines for two hours every seven years. This is their two hours before a dark, steady rainfall (and their probable vitamin D deficiency…) begins again.

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WEIRD DAYS – PURE VISION ART'S GROUP EXHIBITION – ANY COLOUR YOU LIKE

If you’re in New York this week, please join Weird Days at their studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn on Thursday, July 10th for the opening celebration of Pure Vision Art’s group exhibition, Any Colour You Like, co-curated by Makiko Wholey and Anna Schechter. Art by Nicole Appel, Susan Brown, Chase Ferguson, Walter Mika and Simone Steinberg will be exhibited and for sale with wine and hors d’oeuvres starting at 6pm. A good time is sure to be had! Full details below…

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